Eagle Eye and Whammin Watermelon Zoa Corals

Eagle Eye coral and Whammin Watermelon coral are two similar corals. These two types of coral are often confused with each other because some vendors have sold one under the other’s name and vice versa.

These two types of coral are so similar that even more experienced aquarists can’t always tell the difference between the two. The color difference is very subtle – Whammin Watermelon corals have pinkish-red rings while Eagle Eye coral have pinkish-orange rings.

When you keep a coral reef tank, you want to label your coral correctly, so it is important to learn the difference between these two coral types. This article discusses Eagle Eye corals and Whammin Watermelon corals and the differences between the two.

Eagle Eye Zoanthids coral

Eagle Eye Zoanthids are colorful corals that have orange faces with purple in the center and outer ring and bright green tentacles. Rare coral collectors track down this type of coral for its distinctive colors.

The Eagle Eye Zoanthid is easy to care for because it can tolerate a wide range of lighting intensities and water conditions. Another great thing about Eagle Eye Zoanthids is that they multiply quickly.

Where should corals be placed?

When placing your Eagle Eye Zoanthid in your tank, the best place is one where they will receive direct flow and light. This type of coral does not need to be fed because it gets most of its nutritional requirements through photosynthesis. However, Eagle Eye coral can benefit from supplemental feedings.

Water flow

Eagle Eye Zoanthids do best with moderate water flow and low to moderate lighting. Keeping these conditions in your tank can help it maintain its bright colors.

Water conditions Eagle Eye Zoanthids coral

Keep the temperature in your tank between 75 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit or 23 and 26 degrees Celsius. pH should be between 8.1 and 8.4. Calcium should be between 420 and 440 ppm. Alkalinity between 8 and 9.5. Magnesium between 1260 and 1350.

Nitrate levels should be less than 10 ppm. If nitrate levels rise above 10 ppm, you should do a water change. Phosphates should be less than .10 ppm. If Phosphate levels rise, you can replace your phosphate media.

Keeping calcium, alkalinity, and magnesium levels at the proper levels is crucial in helping your Eagle Eye coral thrive. A dosing pump can help you maintain the correct levels automatically.

Whammin Watermelon coral

Whammin Watermelon Zoanthids are similar to the Eagle Eye Zoanthid. These two types of coral have the same design and pattern. The only difference is that the rings on each are slightly different shades.

Like the Eagle Eye coral, Whammin Watermelon coral also requires moderate water flow and moderate lighting. Because they are both Zoanthids, they require the same care.

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Mixing sps lps and soft corals

Zoanthids like the Whammin Watermelon and Eagle Eye are easy to care for and maintain. They come in brilliant, fluorescent colors and grow fairly quickly, forming massive colony formations if left to spread. Zoanthids are hardy and can be maintained in just about any reef tank.

Coral feeding

Just like the Eagle Eye Zoanthid, the Whammin Watermelon Zoanthid can be maintained on lighting alone, but thrive when target-fed supplements. Feeding them regularly will help them grow stronger and faster.

You know that your Zoanthid corals are thriving when they open up and fully extend their polyps. Corals showing bright colors are also happy and healthy, so this is another way to tell if your corals are thriving.

Water conditions for Whammin Watermelon coral

The best water conditions for the Whammin Watermelon coral are the same as for the Eagle Eye coral.

Keep the temperature in your tank between 75 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit or 23 and 26 degrees Celsius. pH should be between 8.1 and 8.4. Calcium should be between 420 and 440 ppm. Alkalinity should be between 8 and 9.5. Magnesium between 1260 and 1350.

Nitrate levels should be less than 10 ppm. If nitrate levels rise above 10 ppm, you should do a water change. Phosphates should be less than .10 ppm. If Phosphate levels rise, you can replace your phosphate media.

Difference between Eagle Eye and Whammin Watermelon Zoa Corals

Both Eagle Eye coral and Whammin Watermelon coral are Zoanthids that have a similar design and pattern and similar colors. Both types of coral require the same care and maintenance.

Some aquarists believe that the two types of coral are actually the same coral species, just marketed under different names. The only difference between the two is their colors, and it is only a slight shade difference from pinkish-orange to pinkish-red.

The common names for corals are generally used to sell corals, and there is no scientific consensus on whether or not Eagle Eye coral is the same as Whammin Watermelon. Because corals are so diverse, it is hard to distinguish distinct species.

Corals are typically sold by their trade names, and anyone can create a name for a “new” coral. This could have been the case with Whammin Watermelon Zoanthids.

Coral colors

Also, the fact that the same species of coral can have different colors is another reason to believe that the Eagle Eye coral and Whammin Watermelon coral are the same coral. Coral appears different under different lighting conditions, so placing Eagle Eye coral next to Whammin Watermelon coral will likely make them indistinguishable.

The reason there is no scientific consensus on the differences between the two is because all Zoanthids have the same Latin name: Zoanthus sp. Since both types of coral have the same Latin name, you can say that they are the same species.

The Eagle Eye Zoanthid coral and the Whammin Watermelon Zoanthid coral have more in common than differences. They are both Zoanthids that appear almost identical and require the same care.

Some coral enthusiasts believe they are distinct species, while others think they’re the same species just marketed under two different names based on the slight difference in color.

Because all Zoanthids have the same Latin name, it is hard to distinguish some species of coral from others. They come in many different colors, and their colors change based on lighting and water conditions.

At the end of the day, you can label your coral either way – Eagle Eye or Whammin Watermelon. If they are the same, then it doesn’t matter. If they are different, no one will know, because even coral vendors can’t always tell the difference.

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